9/22/2018

Lessons To Go - Chords & Arpeggios (part 2)

Part 2 of the "Chords & Arpeggios" lesson series covers 2-octave major arpeggios and shows how to use these arpeggios for building basslines or playing fills.


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If you like to learn to play and improvise with chord arpeggios just hit the Paypal-Button ( $ 12,-) underneath and I'll send you the download-link for the 15-page handout, 23 mp3 files and 10 videos of part 2 within 24 hours. Most of the times I'm faster but if you hit the button in the middle of the night (CET time) you might have to wait a bit longer ;-)


7/30/2018

Lessons To Go - Chords & Arpeggios (part 1)

Totally revised edition of my lesson about major chords. It's now part of my lessons series "Chords & Arpeggios" that will be released over the next weeks!


I often get asked by my students, how to make up your own bassline, when all you have is a sheet with chord symbols.
I want to show you in a multipart lesson about so-called "bassline building" how you can quickly come up with some good-sounding basslines, when all you know is the chords of the song.
The most important approach is to learn which notes belong to a particular chord symbol and to play them as an arpeggio. If you play an arpeggio you play the notes of a chord one after the other contrary to playing them simultaneously like a guitarist or keyboarder would do.
In this first installment I show you the "major arpeggios" i.e. the chord tones of major chords. We talk about some standard fingerings and as playing arpeggio can sometimes be demanding for the fretting hand I show you some exercises for your finger-fitness. We'll finally apply those fingerings in different basslines to accompany major chords.

Here are a few pages of the pdf-handout and one of the accompanying videos:




If you like to learn to play and improvise with chord arpeggios just hit the Paypal-Button ( $ 12,-) underneath and I'll send you the download-link for the 16-page handout, 20 mp3 files and 10 videos of part 1 within 24 hours. Most of the times I'm faster but if you hit the button in the middle of the night (CET time) you might have to wait a bit longer ;-)



7/27/2018

Songs & Basslines - Music theory for bassists #4 (Primary chords)

In this installment of my "Songs & Basslines" series we will take a look at songs utilizing only the primary chords of a major scale and discuss the five basic bassline building techniques.




Here's a nice bassline with major arpeggios to another classic tune: "Twist & Shout"
The version of David Lindley is especacially nice with all the offbeat-arpeggios:


If you like to learn more about utilizing major arpeggios in your basslines, check out my



7/14/2018

Songs & Basslines - Music theory for bassists #03 (the diatonic triads of the C major scale)


The song "A Whiter Shade Of Pale" by Procol Harum is a wonderful example for the relationship between a major scale and it's diatonic chords. While the bassline is moving stepwise up and down through the C major scale the organ and guitar play almost all of the diatonic chords of the C major scale:


7/09/2018

Songs & Basslines - Music theory for bassists #02 (the major scale, part 2)

Here's the second installment of the "Songs & Basslines" series.
The good thing about doing something like this on a blog is, that you can ask or comment if you have any questions, annotations or additions, so feel free to do so :-)



6/29/2018

Songs & Basslines - Music theory for bassists #01 (the major scale)

My philosophy in learning and teaching bass guitar was always to teach overall musicianship from the perspective of a bassplayer rather than focussing only on bass. For a good bass player it is essential to be well versed in all aspects of music. This will help you to develop and play ideas in all styles of music. My new series "Songs & Basslines" is designed to give you a thorough understanding of musical theory as it relates to playing the bass.

So let's start!



Here's a little "Etude in C major" played with the standard fingering from page 9:



This famous bassline is derived from the A major scale: